Expending My Ministry

TL, DR: I’m offering myself as a consultant – at no cost – specifically to smaller congregations that want an online presence and (1) don’t know where to start and (2) can’t afford a paid consultant. I’m also offering a webinar on the basics of live streaming this week. More information on this can be found here.

Ever since I answered God’s calling to pastoral ministry, I have been seeking ways to incorporate my past experience. Especially in the midst of a pandemic, I have noticed that my previous experience in video and audio production have been very beneficial as I have had to make streaming my primary means of preaching and teaching. Rewind a bit: Even before the pandemic, I have seen the need for churches to embrace streaming, social media, and other technologies such as podcasting to reach new people for Jesus. Research shows that people will check out a church online before visiting in-person. Experience has reinforced this, as almost every person who has visited a church that I’ve been the pastor of first found us online and checked out a sermon before attending a worship service.

The reality is this: Congregations and pastors that do not embrace technology are not reaching people other than those who are already sitting in their pews. Online ministry is essential in the 21st Century. Yet, the task of beginning any sort of online ministry can be daunting. There are consultants who try to sell their services, convince congregations that they must have Hollywood-quality equipment and have marketing companies to manage their social media. Smaller congregations especially do not have the means to use consultants in the first place and, the ones that do decide to use one, often become intimidated and overwhelmed. My issue with consultants is that they often have a one-size-fits-all approach and assume that what works in the megachurch will work in the rural congregation. These consultants are out of touch with the reality of the church, which is that the majority of which have an average weekly attendance of 50 or fewer and do not have a ton of money to spend.

Enter Strangely Warmed Media Group.

Strangely Warmed Media Group has been a vision of mine for a few years now but was not something that I pursued. This changed with the COVID-19 pandemic. Especially now, I am seeing that the need for consultants with a heart for the small and rural congregations are essential so this is why I have decided to launch this new aspect of my ministry. God has shown me that using my previous experience in broadcasting in service to the church is part of my call to ministry.

I want to help congregations and pastors who want to do online ministry well but do not believe they are capable and I believe I can help because I have been there and have had to overcome many of the challenges they face.

Just to be clear of a few things: I’m not charging for any of this. This is a ministry that I want to offer to the wider church. This is not going to be a full time venture for me. I see Strangely Warmed Media Group being a resource. I will do occasional webinars and teachings (more on those in a moment) as well as some short-term coaching. I envision this ministry pointing people in the right direction for things such as equipment and giving advice on running social media as opposed to being in active management of assets.

In short, I want to take my experience and pass it along.

I have launched a website which can be found at swmediagroup.net. On there, you will find that I am offering two webinars over the next couple of weeks: One on the basics of streaming and another on effective social media. There is no cost for either and you can register right on the website. If you can not join live, a video will be uploaded to YouTube (channel coming soon).

Again, I see this as an expansion of my current ministry. I don’t want to use this as an extra source of income (hence why I’m not charging money for this) nor will I be changing careers. Rather, this is another component of my ministry that I want to offer to the wider church. Just as Wesley’s heart was strangely warmed on Aldersgate Street and just as he proclaimed that the world was his parish, so too is the world our parish. God wants to use us to warm as many hearts as possible. Often, the tool to do this is social media and streaming.

I’m no expert by any means but I’ve learned a thing or two along the way. Simply, I recognize that online ministry is essential in 2020 and I want to help others do it well.

Racism and Conspiracy Theories are Incompatible with Christianity

As I scroll through social media, I’m disturbed by much of what I see. What we’re seeing is an unprecedented time in world history where information is so easily shared and, at least for the most part, this is a good thing. Unfortunately, this also means that the ease of sharing false and misleading information is also easy. Constantly, I’m seeing Christians share articles that call into question whether or not COVID-19 is real and even how the entire virus was a conspiracy by the Democrats (how this would even be plausible, I have no idea). One video even went to great lengths to try and connect Kobe Bryant’s death to COVID-19 (the mental gymnastics needed for that gave me a headache).

The sharing of racism is also easier than ever. The killing of Ahmaud Arbery has exposed a lot of racism on social media. The father and son who claim they believed he was responsible for burglaries in their neighborhood have been arrested due to a viral video clearly showing that all that occurred was the senseless killing of an unarmed man of color who was only jogging through a neighborhood. Yet, people are defending the actions of these two men, actions that amount to a lynching, which were fueled by the ugly sin of racism. Ahmaud Arbery was shot for being a black man in a white neighborhood.

I’m shocked at the number of Christians who participate in these hijinks. And, pastors: Some of you are the worst.

People are dying because of racism and the denial of medical science. There have been numerous killings of young black men in particular simply for being black and for being in the “wrong place (people like Ahmaud Arbery have just as much right to be jogging down the street as anyone else). People are believing the pseudoscience and outright lies contained in conspiracy articles and videos such as “Plandemic” and are dying because of their distrust of valid, peer reviewed scientific fact (in addition to common sense). The Christians who are sharing these articles are bearing false witness, a false witness that can literally end with someone needlessly dying.

Scripture is clear about a lot of things and speaks clearly to the larger issues surrounding racism and the spread of conspiracy theories. Moses gave this as part of the law: “You must not testify falsely against your neighbor” (Exodus 20:16 NLT). Jesus further clarifies in the parable of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10 that all people are ultimately our neighbor. In other words, to quote the great philosopher Harry Potter: “One mustn’t tell lies.” When we spread conspiracy theories or partake in racism, we are telling lies about our neighbors, in addition to putting our neighbors at risk. God’s law can be boiled down like this when he was asked which commandment was the greatest: “The most important commandment is this: ‘Listen, O Israel! The Lord our God is the one and only Lord. And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ No other commandment is greater than these.” (Mark 12:29-31 NLT)

When we hate our neighbor because of the color of their skin, we are breaking God’s law. When we share conspiracy videos that foster distrust of the medical community and are based on nothing more than a series of coincidences, quakary, and are motivated by personal gain from fame, we are breaking God’s law. We are failing to love our neighbors when we refuse to accept facts that don’t fit our wants and desires because we are putting them at risk.

Christians, we have to do better because to do otherwise is sin.

Pastors, I want to talk to you (and myself) for a moment: Our words have a lot of power. People will take what we say as gospel more often than we perhaps realize. If we use our social media to shed doubt on a racially motivated killing or to spread lies that deny established medical facts then we are leading our people astray. People could die because of your actions. Have you ever considered that? Have you considered that people could not take precautions against COVID-19 because you share a video or an article that sheds doubt on a global crisis? Have you considered that could lead them to their death? Pastors, stop spreading these articles and videos. Stop being silent in the face of racism. Doing otherwise does mean that you are neglecting your office, abusing your power, and being irresponsible with your flock. Fact check. It takes all of thirty seconds to disprove almost all of the conspiracy theories floating around by simply using Google. As for racism, scripture is pretty clear on that. If you cast doubt on racism, it’s not me you have a problem with.

Are we truly disciples? Are we truly committed to Christ? Then we must be committed to loving our neighbors regardless of the color of their skin. We must be committed to sharing the truth and encouraging people take pandemics seriously. We have to practice what we preach and claim to believe.

Racism and conspiracy theories are incompatible with Christian teaching and belief. There’s simply no way around that.

Lent

LentRecently I was having a conversation with one of my fellow student pastor seminarians about liturgy. I grew up in a church that did not follow the liturgical calendar very closely and that didn’t practice special days and seasons such a Ash Wednesday and Lent.  As I expressed to my friend, since I became a Methodist I have really enjoyed studying the traditions and liturgy and have a deep appreciation for them now. While I do not consider myself dogmatic, I do love the details of the different seasons and the major feast days on the Christian calendar.

One of the seasons I have really come to appreciate is Lent. As I mentioned above, I didn’t grow up observing Lent but since I have started I have found that I truly can focus more on God when I give up something that distracts me. I have come to realize that in order to get the most out of this season, I must give up something that is one of my biggest distractions. I love Facebook, Twitter and basically any other form of social media. I love the interaction, being exposed to different points of view than mine, and keeping up with events with people I have known all my life. I also realize that I spent a lot of time concentrating on these things. While they are great, they can be a distraction. Those area the reasons I decided to give up my social media (exceptions made for messenger, maintain church social media, and this blog) for Lent.

What do I hope to gain out of it? First, I want to focus more on my own spiritual development. This has been one of my major goals for the year in general and giving up social media for a season will allow me to more fully put new spiritual practices into practice as well as doing more of my current practices. I also hope to experience more peace. As much as I love social media, it’s often noisy and sometimes downright nasty. I find myself growing angry over things I find out about through social media; this is not something I like about myself. In short, I believe putting down my personal social media and picking up those things that draw me closer to God more often will be good for me.

I made a post to my Facebook page last night explaining that I would not be posting due to this Lenten fast and I closed with a thought that I will also close this blog post out with: What can you pick up in order to bring you closer to God? What can you let go of?